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Mario Kart 8 Deluxe digital game size finally revealed

by on April 11, 2017
 

So one of the glaring issues that fans have pointed out about the Switch since Nintendo released it, is storage and storage management. For one, you can’t movie save files from the internal HDD to a memory card, you can’t even back it up to a cloud. This is a big issue. For instance, let’s say you have a child who may have dropped their Switch and the tablet is busted, the screen is cracked and you need to send it in for repair or replacement. You’d assume like the Xbox, PS4, or even older systems with memory cards, you’d be allowed to move save data from one place to another. Granted, I know this could lead people into trying to move games to and could be a tricky business, eventually leading to counterfeit cards and illegal downloading, but we’re talking game “save” files, not the actual game.

The other major issue? The small amount of internal storage that the Switch comes with, it’s only 32GB. This means games like The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, which has a digital file size of 13.4 GB, it takes up almost half, when you factor in the “available” storage on the internal HDD, as some of that is taken up by system files and the OS running the console. That’s just one game. Other games like the forthcoming DragonQuest Heroes 1 & 2 are so big (32GB), they are more than the system has to offer, when you again, take out the system files and OS from available space. Now keep in mind, this is only an issue if you don’t buy the cartridge based games and choose to download your new Switch games.

While I’m an old school gamer, at the ripe age of 37, I have become more modern in my thinking and have decided to move to digital games, especially on my PS4 and Xbox, unless I can score a physical game really cheap, I tend to go digital. I’ve started that trend, to a degree with the Switch, having purchased both Blaster Master Zero and SNK King of Fighters 98 digitally, only because they are only available in that format, while I purchased Zelda on a cartridge.

So let’s get to Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, Nintendo is putting out promotional material for the game in Germany, that says that the game will have a final size of 6.75GB. That’s not terrible, but again, if you downloaded Zelda at 13.4 and tack on another 6.75, you’re sitting at 20.15GB of used space of 32GB total, again, not including that OS and system/save files. You might be lucky to have 4GB left. So there is only really two options here.

Option 1 – Buy your games physically on cartridges and save your HDD space for save files and digital only games (i.e. Blaster Master, SNK games, etc.) This does two things, one, it allows you to move from system to system if there is an issue, though you can’t take your save files, at least you don’t have to re-download a game that is several GB in size, it uses much less storage space overall.

Option 2 – Buy a large microSD card. Nintendo says that the Switch supports up to 2TB of microSD storage, which is awesome, that puts it on par with the PS4 and Xbox One. However, those cards are not available to the mass market yet and when they do become available they will be extremely expensive. For instance a 256GB microSD card costs roughly $150-$165. That’s for a named brand like Samsung or PNY. While I normally have no problem buying cheaper cards on eBay or Amazon for pictures and phones, when you are buying a card to hold all your games and save data, I highly suggest getting a card that is from a reputable company. The last thing you need is for your to wig out and become corrupt and you lose 80 hours of Zelda.

I know this topic went a little more indepth than just reporting the size of Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, but I felt it was important to bring those issues to the surface for some readers who might be thinking about getting a Switch. All that said, I thoroughly enjoy my Switch. I also have a 128GB PNY card, which for right now, is working perfectly. I do hope that down the line Nintendo updates their console to allow moving save files, but for now, that’s a no go.